Provost's Awards Lecture Series
Fall 2017

This series is to honor and showcase each year's recipients of the Provost's Awards.

THURSDAY, September 14, 2017
3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Henry Madden Library, Room 2206

PRESENTERS:

Cristina Herrera, Department of Chicano and Latin American Studies
Recipient of the 2016-2017 - Distinguished Achievement in Research, Scholarship or Creative Accomplishment Award

"On Reclaiming the ChicaNerd: The Chicana Anti-Chola that Persists in Spite of Her Invisibility"

Dr. Herrera will begin her presentation by discussing current research projects, representations of teenage Chicana girls in Chicana/Latina young adult (YA) literature, of which she dubs ChicaNerds for their burgeoning social consciousness and interest in “nerdy” topics like science, math, and poetry. Although popular culture is rife with images of the “tough” Latina, such as the “chola” or “homegirl,” her work expands this narrow view of young Latina womanhood by drawing attention to academic, “nerdy” Chicanas/Latinas. As a self-identified Chicana nerd herself, Dr. Herrera will discuss the empowering possibilities of young Chicana nerds who struggle for visibility when the common script of young Latina womanhood reduces us to tough-talking and streetwise cholas and little else. 

AND

Victor Torres, Department of Chicano and Latin American Studies
Recipient of the 2016-2017 - Faculty Service Award

"Service, Ethnic Work, Weapon of Resistance: The Power of the Zapateado"

Since its introduction in California and throughout the Southwest, Mexican folkloric dance has become a popular source of “cultural entertainment."  However, Mexican folkloric dance, like other forms of ethnic dance, is not simply a form of entertainment. Dr. Torres' lecture will briefly describe the critical social and political function that Mexican folkloric dance has historically played in the Chicano/Mexican community. 

Thursday, October 26, 2017
3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Henry Madden Library, Room 2206

PRESENTERS:

Recipients of the 2016-2017 Promising New Faculty Award

Alicia Brown Becton, Department of Counselor Education and Rehabilitation

"Lift Every Voice:" How to Flourish in a Culturally Diverse Classroom?

In this presentation, Dr. Becton will briefly explain cultural competency in education and challenges faced by faculty and students. She will share her experience in applying and integrating culture competency into pedagogy to enhance students’ learning. Additionally, she will discuss the importance of a culturally informed educator and strategies to effectively “Lift Every Voice” in the classroom. Her approach will provoke audience discussion and challenge faculty to share their experiences. 

AND

 Jennifer Randles, Department of Sociology

"Addressing Family Inequalities: The Synergy of Teaching, Research, and Service"
Family inequalities—such as those related to poverty, gender, and competing ideological definitions of what counts as family—are struggles that significantly shape the lived experiences and educational trajectories of many, including most of our students at Fresno State. In this talk, Dr. Randles will share her experiences teaching about, researching, and working with community benefit organizations that address these challenges. She will specifically discuss how her experiences with students have profoundly shaped her research agenda and service commitments in positive ways and how she brings knowledge gained from research and service back into the classroom.  

Thursday, November 30, 2017
3:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Henry Madden Library, Room 2206

PRESENTERS:

Recipients of the 2016-2017 Promising New Faculty Award

Amber Hammons, Department of Child, Family and Consumer Sciences

"If at First You Don't Succeed: Lessons Learned From Implementing an Obesity Prevention Program"

In her talk, Dr. Hammons will share some of the challenges her team encountered when implementing an obesity prevention program. She will explain why she believes these initial implementation failures resulted in a stronger program and student engagement.

AND

Chris Sterling, Department of Management

"Come on Baby Light my Fire: Developing and Utilizing Energizing Social Ties for Creative Implementation."

Social networks are vital for organizational creativity and performance. Recent findings suggest that the emotional content of relationships may be more important than the instrumental content of relationships. Dr. Sterling will discuss two ongoing research projects examining the role of energizing social ties: informal relationships that inspire and energize others. The first project, a study of research scientists at a large pharmaceutical company, demonstrates the importance of energizing ties in the process of creative implementation. The second project explores how individuals can create more energizing social ties through mindfulness and charismatic leadership.

 

 Fresno State is committed to providing universal access to all our guests. Please contact the Office of the Provost at 559.278.2636 to request disability accommodations.