Biology

BIOL 1A. Introductory Biology

Course one of two-semester sequence required of all biology majors. Thematic introduction to the unifying concepts of life science: chemical basis of life; cellular processes; energy metabolism; genetics; evolution. G.E. Breadth B2. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly BIOSC 1A) (Course fee, $15)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 1B. Introductory Biology

First-time enrollees must take BIOL 1BL concurrently. Course two of a two-semester sequence required of all biology majors. Continuation of thematic introduction to the unifying concepts of life science: classification and diversity of life; survey of the living organisms; physiology; ecology and environmental biology. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly BIOSC 1B).

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 1BL. Introductory Biology Laboratory

First-time enrollees must take BIOL 1B concurrently. Required of all biology majors. Continuation of thematic introduction to the unifying concepts of life scienec: Laboratory exercises in evolution, classification and diversity of life; survey of the living organisms; physiology; ecology and environmental biology. (6 lab hours) (Course fee, $15) (Formerly BIOSC 1B)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 10. Life Science

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 1A. How living things work and why they work that way. Biology from chemical and physical foundations to ecological and evolutionary processes. Biology and its relationship to human affairs. G.E. Breadth B2. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Course fee, $5)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 11. Plant Biology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 1B (formerly BIOSC 1B). Structure, function, and development of plants. G.E. Breadth B2. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly BOT 10) (Course fee, $15)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 12. Animal Biology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 1B. Structural and functional comparison of animals; principles and human implications of inheritance, evolution, and ecology; physiology as applied to man. G.E. Breadth B2. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Formerly ZOOL 10)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: B2

BIOL 20. Introductory Microbiology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 120. Prerequisites: CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A. Introduction to microbiology; principles and selected applications. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly MICRO 20)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 33. Human Anatomy and Physiology

Three units allowed for students with prior credit in human anatomy; 2 units allowed for students with prior credit in human physiology. An integrated study of the structure and function of the human body. (4 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly PHYAN 33)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 64. Functional Human Anatomy

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 33. Primarily for students in the health related and biological professions. The life continuum from conception to death. A systems approach to the gross and microscopic structures of the human body. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly PHYAN 64)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 65. Human Physiology

Not open to students with credit in BIOL 33. College chemistry and human anatomy recommended. Homeostasis in the human body; how organ systems function to maintain life; dynamic and adaptive systems at the molecular, cellular, and organ level. (4 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 65)

Units: 5
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 101. General Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B; PSYCH 42 or MATH 101, or EES 178 (EES majors only). MATH 70 or equivalent recomended. Required of all biology majors. The structure, function, organization, and regulation of populations, communities, and ecosystems. The role of evolution in environmental relationships. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)* (Formerly BIOSC 130) (Course fee, $15)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 102. Genetics

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B. Co-requisites: CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A. Required of all biology majors. Fundamentals of inheritance, including an introduction to the underlying molecular mechanisms. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly BIOSC 140A)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 103. Cellular Biology

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 and either CHEM 150 or CHEM 155. Fundamentals of inheritance and cellular biology for both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, including an introduction to the underlying molecular mechanisms. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly BIOSC 140B)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 104. Genetics and Cell Biology Lab

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103 (BIOL 103 may be taken concurrently.) Required of all biology majors. Must be taken a minimum of four semesters from completing BIOL 103. Basic techniques in molecular genetics and cell biology. No credit if BIOSC 140B taken prior to fall 2005. (3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BIOSC 140L lab)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 105. Evolution

Prerequisites: senior standing or permission of instructor; BIOL 101, BIOL 102, and BIOL 103. Required of all biology majors. Evolutionary processes and patterns. Satisfies the senior major requirement for the B.S. in Biology. (Formerly BIOSC 180)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 110. Human Ecology

The study of the relationships between humans and their environment, both natural and man-made; emphasis on scientific understanding of root causes of current environmental problems. (Formerly BIOL 105)

Units: 3

BIOL 120. Microbiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B; CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A; or BIOL 11 and CHEM 150. Emphasis on prokaryotes (bacteria); microbial physiology, genetics, ecology, classification, and identification; applications of microbiology. Prerequisite to most upper-division microbiology courses. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly MICO 140)

Units: 4

BIOL 121. Medical Microbiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 120; BIOL 157 recommended. The role of microorganisms in causing infection and disease; strategies for diagnosing and treating infections. (3 lecture hours) (Formerly MICRO 183)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 122. Nonvascular Plants

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Comparative structure and phylogeny of the fungi, algae, mosses, and liverworts. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BOT 132)

Units: 3

BIOL 123. Phycology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Morphology, cytology, ecology, physiology, economic importance, and cultivation of the algae. (2 lecture, 6 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $30) * (Formerly BOT 142)

Units: 4

BIOL 124. Vascular Plants

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Morphology, reproduction, and evolution of the major groups of vascular plants (both living and extinct). Emphasis placed upon the seed plants. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly BOT 131)

Units: 4

BIOL 125. Plant Taxonomy

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and 1B or permission of instructor. Principles of plant classification; local flora. (1 lecture, 6 lab or field hours) (Formerly BOT 144)

Units: 3

BIOL 130. Invertebrate Zoology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B. Systematics and phylogeny (based primarily upon external and internal anatomy) and general ecology of free-living invertebrates (excluding insects). Includes field studies of marine and occasionally freshwater habitats. (2 lecture, 6 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $25) * (Formerly ZOOL 141)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 131. Parasitology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B and CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A. A study of the biology of parasitic organisms, including those of humans. Lecture topics: life history strategies, infectious processes, epidemiology, ecology, parasite evolution and phylogeny, diagnosis and treatment. Laboratory and field exercises: identification and samplin techniques, taxanomy, investigation of biological processes. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours*) (cOURSE FEE, $20) (Formerly ZOOL 148)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 132. General Entomology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B. Anatomy, physiology, life history, and classification of insects and other arthropods. (2 lecture, 3 lab or field hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 120)

Units: 3

BIOL 133. Natural History of Vertebrates

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Systematics, distribution, morphology, behavior, and ecology of fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals. Fieldwork includes capture and sampling techniques, species identification and habitat analysis, and may require weekend field trips to coastal, desert,a nd mountain environments. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 150)

Units: 4

BIOL 134. Ichthyology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Ecology, evolution, and diversity of the fish of the world with emphasis on California fish, freshwater and marine. (2 lecture, 3 lab or field hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 171)

Units: 3

BIOL 135. Biology of Reptiles and Birds

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Ecology, ethology, and evolution of the reptiles and birds of the world. Encompasses the traditional areas of herpetology and ornithology. (3 lecture, 3 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $25) * (Formerly ZOOL 174)

Units: 4

BIOL 136. Mammalogy

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Ecology, evolution, and diversity of the mammals of the world. (2 lecture, 3 lab or field hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 177)

Units: 3

BIOL 140. Plant Anatomy

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B or permission of instructor. Structure and development of flowering plants at the cellular and tissue levels. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly BOT 133)

Units: 3

BIOL 141. Histology

Prerequisites: BIOL 103. Identification and study of vertebrate cells, tissues, and organs. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 134)

Units: 4

BIOL 142. Vertebrate Embryology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B. Morphogenesis of vertebrates from gamete formation through organogenesis, including physiological and experimental aspects of development. Laboratory emphasis on frog, chick, and pig. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 135)

Units: 4

BIOL 143. Comparative Vertebrate Morphology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A, BIOL 1B. Comparative structure of vertebrate organ systems; laboratory study of representative vertebrates. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Formerly ZOOL 132) (Class fee, $30)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 144. Neuroanatomy

Prerequisites: BIOL 33 or BIOL 64 or BIOL 65. Macroscopic and microscopic study of the structure and functional relationships of the human nervous system. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly PHYAN 130)

Units: 4

BIOL 150. Molecular Biology

Prerequisites: BIOL 102; BIOL 103; CHEM 150 or CHEM 155. The study of genome structure and fluidity, prokaryotic and eukaryotic gene expression, and genomics. If GENET 142 was taken prior to Fall 2005, it is equivalent to BIOL 150 and BIOL 151 (formerly GENET 143). (3 lecture hours) (Formerly GENET 142)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 151. Bioinformatics

Prerequisite: BIOL 102; and BIOL 103; CHEM 150 or 155. Recommended pre- or co-requisite, BIOL 150. Practical use and application of computational tools for the analysis nucleic acids and proteins. Genomic database searching. Sequence alignment, molecular phylogenetic analysis, secondary and tertiary structure modeling of biological macromolecules. No credit if GENET 142 was taken prior to Fall 2005. (1 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $10) (Formerly GENET 143)

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 152. Experimental Molecular Genetics

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. The nature of genetic information, its mutation, transfer, and recombination in cells. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $30) (Formerly GENET 171)

Units: 4

BIOL 153. Microbial Genetics

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 120 or permission of instructor. Genetic variation, gene transfer, and regulation of gene expression in model microbial systems and medically and industrically important microbes. ( 3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly GENET 182)

Units: 4

BIOL 155. Developmental Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. Investigations concerning the variety of mechanisms acting during the several stages of development of the living organism, from gamete formation to morphological and biochemical differentiation of organ systems; emphasis on different genetic control. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly GENET 172)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 156. Plant Growth and Development

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 or permission of instructor. Processes involved in plant growth with emphasis on the development of form in higher plants and the experimental approach. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BOT 137)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 157. Immunology

Prerequisites: BIOL 102 required; BIOL 103 and CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 highly recommended. Principles of mammalian immune response, featuring the molecular and cellular interactions involved in both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Regulatory controls and adverse clinical conditions involving immune functions are addresses. Experimental basis of inquiry is emphasized. (Formerly PHYAN 160)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 157L. Immunology Laboratory

Prerequisites: BIOL 157 and either BIOL 103 and BIOL 104 or BIOL 120 (formerly MICRO 140). Experimental illustration of immune response; classical and contemporary immunology techniques; interpretation and presentation of experimental outcomes. (6 lab hours, 1 hour discussion) (Course fee, $30) (Formerly PHYAN 160L)

Units: 3

BIOL 160. Microbial Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 120. Structure, function, energy metabolism, growth, and regulatory mechanisms of microorganisms. (2 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly MICO 161)

Units: 4

BIOL 161. Plant Physiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B (or BIOL 11); CHEM 1A or CHEM 3A; CHEM 3B or CHEM 8 or CHEM 128A; or permission of instructor. General metabolism (photosynthesis, water relations, respiration, nutrient use, etc.) of plants and functional integration with structure. (3 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly BOT 130)

Units: 4

BIOL 162. Comparative Animal Physiology

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. Evolution of physiological systems; functional adaptations to different environments; physiological principles as applied to animals. (3 lecture) (Formerly PHYAN 151 lecture)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 162L. Comparative Animal Physiology Lab

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. BIOL 162 is a pre- or co-requisite. Comparative experimental approach to understanding how animals adapt to different environmental challenges and investigations into physiological processes. (3 lab hours) (Course fee, $20) (Formerly PHYAN 151 Lab component)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 163. Advanced Human Physiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 103 and either BIOL 65 or equivalent. Primarily for students in biology and in the health professions. Advanced study of the cardiovascular, respiratory, excretory, and digestive systems. Concepts explaining normal functioning will be illustrated through study of specific examples, such as exercise. (Formerly PHYAN 163)

Units: 3

BIOL 164. Hematology

Prerequisite: BIOL 103; BIOL 65 and BIOL 157 recommended. Development, structure, identification, and quantification of cellular blood elements; qualitative and quantitative considerations of hemoglobin, coagulation, and immunohematology. (Formerly PHYAN 162)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 165. Endocrinology

Prerequisite: BIOL 102 and BIOL 103. A systems approach to the study of hormone synthesis, secretion, function as intercellular signals, and their role in both controlling and integrating normal physiological processes. (Formerly PHYAN 165)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 166. Neurophysiology

Prerequisites: BIOL 33 or BIOL 64 or BIOL 65 or BIOL 103 or BIOL 162. Function of the human nervous system with emphasis on molecular mechanisms of electrical and chemical signaling. (Formerly PHYAN 140)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 170. Microbial Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 101 and BIOL 120. Physiological ecology of microorganisms; interactions of microorganisms with abiotic and biotic factors in the environment; microbial habitats including soil, water, and organisms; techniques of microbial ecology (field laboratory). (3 lecture, 3 lab hours)* * Late afternoon, Saturday and/or overnight field trips may be required.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 171. Terrestrial Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. The interaction of organisms and communities with the physical and biotic environment, with emphasis on the biotic communities of Central California. (3 lecture, 3 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $20) * (Formerly ECOL 151)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 172S. Aquatic Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Physical-chemical features of inland waters as related to their biology; community structure and function, ecological interactions, adaptations, and identification of aquatic organisms. (3 lecture, 3 lab or field hours) (Course fee, $15) * (Formerly BIOL 172)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 173. Marine Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 1B or BIOL 12. Introduction to the marine environment with emphasis on the biological aspects; systematics, ecology, and morphological and physiological adaptations of marine organisms, especially intertidal and shallow water forms; pollution; utilization of marine resources. (One field trip required) (Formerly ECOL 135)

Units: 3

BIOL 174. Animal Behavior

Prerequisite: BIOL 101; one additional course in ecology or natural history recommended. Principles of ethology with emphasis on mechanisms of behavior. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)* (Formerly ZOOL 152)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 175. Case Studies in Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 101. Discussion-based course focusing on analysis and problem solving in ecology. Cases are grounded in basic ecological and environmental science, but include relevance and application to sociological, economic, and political considerations. (2 lecture hours, 1 TBA) (Formerly ECOL 140)

Units: 3

BIOL 176. Field Methods Ecology

Prerequisite: BIOL 101. Teaches a broad range of field methods used in ecology. Focuses on quantitative techniques for studying animal populations: census techniques, capture/marking, radio telemetry, habitat assessment, behavioral observation and experiments, and design and logistics of field experiments. (2 lecture; 3 lab hours) (Course fee, $25) (Formerly ECOL 141)

Units: 3

BIOL 178. Systematic Biology

Prerequisite: BIOL 1A and BIOL 1B; BIOL 102 and BIOL 103 recommended. Modern theory and methods of phylogenetic analysis applied to the study of biodiversity and evolution. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours) (Formerly ECOL 174)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

BIOL 181. Seminar in Cellular and Molecular Biology

Prerequisites: BIOL 150 may be co-requisite or permission of instructor. Trends and breakthroughs in cellular and molecular biology accessed through the primary literature. (1 seminar hour) (Formerly GENET 170)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Spring

BIOL 185T. Protozoology

Units: 3

BIOL 189T. Topics in Biology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of selected areas in the field of biology. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 6 units

BIOL 189T. Science of Addiction

This course will introduce students to what exactly is "addiction". Basic brain anatomy and physiology will be discussed as it pertains to addiction. The course will discuss all addictions (e.g., drugs, alcohol, sex, gambling, etc.) and how addiction alters brain chemistry. The Twelve Steps of Recovery will be introduced and explained as well as steps to recovery. The goal is bring a level of mature understanding of addiction is.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

BIOL 189T. The Biology of Cancer

Prerequisites: BIOL 103. An examination of the environmental causes of cancer, the underlying genetic and cellular changes that lead to a cancer diagnosis, and new strategies for treatments.

Units: 3

BIOL 189T. Biology Colloquium

The aim of the Biology Colloquium is to expose undergraduate students to selected topics in biology. Speakers within the department and outside the department and university will address topics in their speciality.

Units: 1

BIOL 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement - Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

BIOL 204. Biology of Speciation

Prerequisites: BIOSC 140A-B and 180. Evolution of the species as a unit of biological organization.

Units: 2

BIOL 208. Biological Field Studies

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Integrated studies or specialized topics, including botanical, environmental, microbiological, or zoological field studies. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-6

BIOL 225. Molecular Evolution

Patterns and processes by which biological molecules evolve. Lecture topics include rates and modes of DNA sequence evolution, molecular phylogenetics, gene duplication, concerted evolution, genome organization, and application of computers to comparative

Units: 3

BIOL 230. Foundations of Ecology

Prerequisites: permission of instructor. Ideas and papers that defined ecology as an independent scientific discipline are discussed, both in the context of their time of publication and in comparison to current ecological paradigms. Time period covered is late 19th century to present.

Units: 2

BIOL 240. Systems Ecology

Prerequisites: BIOL 130, MATH 70. Quantitative approach to the analysis of whole ecosystems including data acquisition and statistical treatment, conceptual and mathematical ecosystem modeling, and computer simulations in FORTRAN or BASIC. No programming experience needed. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3

BIOL 241A. Molecular Biology I-II

(BIOL 241A same as CHEM 241A and FBS 241A.) Prerequisites: BIOL 102, BIOL 103, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 or permission of instructor. Current topics in molecular biology are addressed, including protein and nucleic acid structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulation, mechanisms of exchange of generic material, and recombinant DNA technology.

Units: 3

BIOL 241B. Molecular Biology I-II

(Same as BIOL 241A and BIOL 241B.) Prerequisites: BIOL 140A, BIOL 140B, CHEM 150 or CHEM 155, or permission of instructor. BIOL 241A/CHEM 241A is prerequisite for BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B. Current topics in molecular biology are addressed, including protein and nucleic acid structure, DNA replication, transcription, translation, prokaryotic and eukaryotic regulation, mechanisms of exchange of generic material, and recombinant DNA technology.

Units: 3

BIOL 242. Techniques in Protein Purification and Analysis

(Same as CHEM 242.) Prerequisite: CHEM 151 or CHEM 156 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: BIOL 241A or CHEM 241A. Deals with the technologies relevant to protein isolation, purification, analysis, immobilization, and modification in micro and macro quantities. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Class fee, $40)

Units: 3

BIOL 243. Nucleic Acid Technology Lab

(Same as BIOL 243.) Prerequisites: BIOL 241A or CHEM 241A and BIOL 242 or CHEM 242. Corequisite: BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B. A lecture/laboratory course focusing on the technologies used in nucleic acid chemistry; specifically, synthesis, translation, mutagenesis, and genetic engineering. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours) (Course fee, $40)

Units: 3

BIOL 244. Cell Culture Techniques

(Same as CHEM 244.) Prerequisites: BIOL 103 and BIOL 104. The theory and practice of in vitro propagation of eukaryotic cells, including growth characteristics, metabolic requirements, genetic analysis, and screening assays. Special focus is on cancer cell lines with the potential for stem cell manipulation relative to cell biology culture and application to biotechnology. (1 lecture, 6 lab hours)

Units: 3

BIOL 245. Industrial Biotechnology

Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 150 or CHEM 155 or permission of Instructor. Theory and current practices of bioprocessing, including hands-on experience with standard techniques and formulation of a strategic plan for a new technology or product. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours).

Units: 3

BIOL 248. Seminar in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology

(CHEM 248 same as BIOL 248.) Prerequisite: admission to the biology or chemistry graduate program. Preference will be given to students enrolled in the Master of Biotechnology or Biotechnology Certificate Programs. Reviews and reports on current literature in various aspects of biotechnology and molecular biology.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 4 units

BIOL 250. Scientific Writing

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Prepare a writing sample to fulfill Graduate Writing Requirement; how to write a proposal for a research project, including language (composition for scientific writers), structure (elements of proposals), and content (literature review, scientific question). (3 lecture hours)

Units: 3

BIOL 255T. Topics in Botany

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution

Application of molecular markers to studies of species, populations and natural history of aquatic and terrestrial organisms; Biodiversity and historical biogeography.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units

BIOL 260T. Experimental Design for Biologists

A good understanding of the scientific method and experimental design are key to successful research in biology. Experimental Design for Biologists offers an overview of the philosophy of science and the scientific method, and helps students establish the framework for their experimental projects. The course will guide students on how to 1) set up a study system, 2) frame experimental question and develop critical hypotheses, 3) design experiments to test hypotheses, 4) determine and use the correct set of controls, and 5) interpret the results of experiments.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 8 units

BIOL 260T. Population Genetics

This course will cover population genetics from the modern synthesis through molecular population genetics and up to new methods in population genomics. Emphasis will be placed on understanding and applying the strong theory that underlies population genetics to evolutionary and ecological problems. The course will include lecture and discussion, with emphasis on student participation.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Endocrinology of Metabolism

This course will investigate how different endocrine systems interact to regulate metabolism in vertebrates. Emphasis will be placed on understanding the molecular, cellular, and endocrine mechanisms that influence metabolism at the level of tissues, organs and the animal as a whole. The course will be a combination of lecture and discussion format, with an emphasis of student participation.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Advanced Topics in Bionanotechnology

This seminar will be based on instructor and student-led presentations and discussions of current literature in bionanotechnology. Potential topics include: self-assembly vs. self-replication in a molecular context, emerging applications in nano-engineering for biology, thermodynamic considerations of the molecular organization of lipid bilayers, ion channels of excitable membranes, integrated nanofluidics systems, and advances in synthetic biology and directed evolution.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Applied Bioethics

This course explores historical and modern ethical issues in order to prepare students to understand and to address situations they will likely encounter in biological research. Topics include responsible data management, publications and authorship, negligence and fraud, conflict of interest, and the use of animals and humans in research. The course will combine brief background lectures with case study presentations and discussions.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Molecular Virology

Core lectures on molecular virology along with discussions of the current literature. The course will emphasize the molecular basis of viral replication, survival and spread within a host population and the key virus-host interactions that lead to disease. The course will also highlight novel approaches of inhibiting viral infection and the ethnical use of viral agents in "dual use" research.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Topics in Biology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 260T. Biology Colloquium

The aim of the Biology Colloquium is to expose graduate students to selected topics in biology. Speakers within the department and outside the department and university will address topics in their speciality.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 265T. Topics in Physiology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 270T. Topics in Zoology

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of new fields, areas not in current courses, or advanced studies in a given area. (Lecture and/or laboratory)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 9 units

BIOL 274. Biostatistics & Experimental Design

Prerequisite: one statistics class, preferably MATH 101. Application of statistical techniques to biological problems with emphasis on sampling, analysis of variance, experimental design, and regression techniques. Emphasis on analysis of real biological data and interpretation of results.

Units: 3

BIOL 275. Biogeography

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Seminar in descriptive and ecological geography of animal and plant groups.

Units: 3

BIOL 281. Seminar in Biological Science

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Reviews and reports on current literature in the various phases of biology.

Units: 1-2, Repeatable up to 3 units

BIOL 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement [-LINK-]. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

BIOL 295. Research

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Independent research by the advanced graduate student.

Units: 2-6

BIOL 298C. Project Continuation

Project Continuation

Units: 0

BIOL 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: See [-LINK-]. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for SP grading.

Units: 2-4

BIOL 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis BUIOL 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

BIOTC 275. Biotechnology Industrial Experience

Prerequisites: PSM Program Classification; BIOL 241B or CHEM 241B; BIOL 248 or CHEM 248; BUS 272; or permission of instructorInternship to develop familiarity with biotechnology business practices. Requires a minimum of 150 hours of onsite work and completion of a project for written and oral presentation. Specific placement is facilitated by the PSM coordinator. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 3

BIOTC 298. Biotechnology Culminating Project

Prerequisites: PSM Advancement to Candidacy and completion of all other courses in the program of study. Field studies, including appropriate experimentation, addressing a biotechnology business/science problem identified through student's independent analysis. Extensive written documentation on the plans and outcomes are required. A final progress report meeting the requirements of the culminating experience for a Master's degree and an oral defense are required. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 4

BIOTC 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project BIOTC 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

BIOTC 299. Thesis

Prerequisites include PSM advancement to candidacy and completion of all other courses in the program of study. Preparation, completion and submission of an acceptable thesis for a Master's Degree addressing. An oral defense is required. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 4

BIOTC 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis BIOTC 299. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

CI 161. Mth Mtl Biol

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - Biology

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg Biol

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 999 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring