Child Development, B.S.

Department

Department of Child, Family, and Consumer Sciences

Kathie Reid, Chair
Family and Food Sciences Building, Room 111
559.278.2283
www.fresnostate.edu/jcast/cfcs

Degrees and Programs Offered

BA in Family & Consumer Sciences - Fashion Merchandising Emphasis, B.A.
BA in Family & Consumer Sciences - Family Sciences Emphasis, B.A.
BA in Family & Consumer Sciences - Family Sciences, B.A.
BS in Child Development, B.S.
BS in Child Development - Pre-Credential Option, B.S.
MN in Family & Consumer Sciences, Minor
MN in Fashion Merchandising, Minor

The Child, Family, and Consumer Sciences Department is dedicated to improving the quality of life for children and families through education, research, and service. The department offers two degree programs toward this end: (1) a Bachelor of Arts in Family and Consumer Science (FCS) encompassing two areas of emphasis - Family Science and Fashion Merchandising and (2) a Bachelor of Science in Child Development that includes three degree paths - the traditional Child Development Option, Child Development Practitioner Option, and Pre-Credential Option.

All majors must consult with a department academic adviser to determine the emphasis or degree path most appropriate to their career or personal goals.

The CFCS Department is housed in the Family and Food Sciences (FFS) Building on the west side of campus. The department maintains laboratory facilities that support our academic programs. These include clothing and textile labs, a child and family observation lab, and two child care labs serving infants, toddlers, and preschool children where students study child behavior and development under the supervision of faculty and laboratory teaching staff.

Bachelor of Arts in Family and Consumer Science

Family Sciences Emphasis. Courses correspond with suggested content areas outlined by the National Council on Family Relations (NCFR). Areas include the following: internal dynamics of families, interpersonal relationships, human growth and development, families in society, parent education and guidance, family resource management, family law and public policy, and family life education. Graduates pursue opportunities in parent education, family life education, adolescent counseling, military family support, child and family service agencies.

Fashion Merchandising. The Fashion Merchandising program focuses on preparing students for a wide variety of careers related to marketing, management, buying, and selling of fashion goods. It combines product and industry knowledge with business, communication, and computer skills. Job opportunities include buyers, merchandisers, store managers, product developers, and fashion consultants, as well as other positions in today's competitive and global environment. The curriculum is built upon the Mega Goals for Four-Year programs developed by the International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) and recommendations from fashion industry experts.

Bachelor of Science in Child Development

The Bachelor of Science in Child Development prepares students for a wide variety of careers working with children and families. Students should select an option within the major based on their career goals, and each option is described below. Under the California Child Development permit structure, the bachelor’s degree qualifies early education and care teachers for the master teacher and site supervisor levels.

Child Development Option

The traditional Child Development Option provides breadth and depth in the child and family sciences. It provides an excellent foundation for careers or graduate studies in social science, human services, education, child and family health, family law, counseling, or college teaching. It also provides excellent preparation to those who have, or will have, families.

Child Development Practitioner Option

The Practitioner Option is an accelerated, year-round, cohort-based program tailored to the unique career needs of professionals working in Early Care and Education. It provides advanced preparation in child development theory and in early childhood practice. This option has limited enrollment. Students must meet eligibility requirements and complete an application process in order to be considered for admission. Under the California Child Development Permit structure, the bachelor's degree qualifies practitioners for master teacher, site supervisor, and program director levels.

Note: The Child Development Practitioner Option has been suspended as of Fall 2012.

Pre-Credential Option

The Pre-Credential Option prepares prospective elementary school teachers for the challenges of the contemporary classroom. It provides students with comprehensive preparation in child development and family science to prepare future teachers to understand and work effectively with children and parents. It includes interdisciplinary coursework that addresses California State Standards requirements and is aimed at developing competence in working with culturally and linguistically diverse populations characteristic of California and other diverse regions of the country. This option provides a degree path for students wishing to pursue the Multiple Subject Credential postbaccalaureate.

Note: Pre-Credential Option students are strongly encouraged to follow the lower- and upper-division General Education pattern designated by the Kremen School of Education and Human Development Liberal Studies Blended Program. Courses in this pattern have been approved for G.E. credit for Pre-Credential Option students. See adviser for details.

Courses

Child Family & Consumer Sci

CFS 31. The Family in America

Prerequisite: G.E. Foundation A2. Interdisciplinary introduction to American families, their place within society, and their influence on human behavior. Topics include historical development, social functions, methods for studying, cultural and subcultural influence and meaning, family types, parenting, family violence, and the impact of race, class, and gender. G. E. Breadth D3.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring
GE Area: D3

CFS 32. Intimacy

An exploration of personal, relationship, and social aspects which contribute to loving relationships. Barriers to loving will also be discussed. Topics include the nature of love, awareness, emotional needs, fears, communication, conflict, values, beliefs, expecations, freedom, and responsibility.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 37. Introductory Child Development Practicum

An interdisciplinary study in a laboratory setting of the physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of toddler and pre-school children. Children's relationships to family, peers, community, and culture will be a primary focus. Antibias curriculum will be explored through principle and practice. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 38. Life Span Development

A balanced study of basic theories, research, applications, and principles of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development from conception to death, presented in an integrated manner in the context of the family in a diverse society. Includes behavior, sexuality, nutrition, health, stress environmental relationships, and implications of death and dying. G. E. Breadth E1.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

CFS 39. Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development

An interdisciplinary study of physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development from conception through adolescence. Examines development in contexts of family, culture, and socio-historical perspective. Introduces child study methodologies. G.E. Breadth E1

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

CFS 90T. Topics in Child Dev and/or Family Science

Topics related to child development and/or family relations

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 99 units

CFS 90T. Childhood Obesity: Causes and Consequences

The purpose of this blended course is to provide a transdisciplinary curriculum on the causes and consequences of childhood obesity during early childhood. The course includes web-based micro lectures by leading national experts across multiple disciplines, such as faculty in human development, psychology, biology, nutritional sciences, and early care and education. The curriculum promotes collaboration, interdisciplinary thinking, and strong interpersonal communication skills.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 9 units

CFS 110. Child Development, Play, and Learning

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Examination of child development theories as they relate to play and learning in young children. Considers cultural and developmental perspectives, emphasizes theories in practice, and provides a theoretical framework for structuring, observing, analyzing, and evaluating play and play problems.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 112. Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum and the Environment

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Developmentally appropriate curriculum planning, implementation, and assessment in the child care setting. Addresses content area integration and literacy development in a context of social/emotional development and interaction. Considers the role of environment in the curriculum.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CFS 113. Working with Diverse Families

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Examines communication patterns, barriers, and strategies that impact practitioner-parent and practitioner-child interactions. Emphasis on perspective-taking, building partnerships, cultural responsiveness, and anti-bias practices as well as on building partnerships.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 114. Child Crisis and Community Resources

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Examination of common childhood crises such as divorce, loss through death, abuse and neglect, and societal violence. Emphasizes intervention strategies appropriate to child care settings. Familiarizes students with community resources.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CFS 115. Action Research in the Classroom

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Introduction to action research methodology and practice for the child development practitioner. Includes orientation to print and electronic research sources, familiarization with the Henry Madden Library, research at students' work sites, and documentation and presentation of findings.

Units: 6
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 117. Trends and Issues: Advocacy and Policy Development

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Examination of social trends and policies affecting young children and the child development field. Familiarization with child advocacy organizations. Strategies and tools for affecting policy at the work site and within local and state government. Practical application at the community level. Not available for CR/NC grading.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 118. Program Evaluation: Models and Tools

Introduction to and application of current accreditation, quality standards, and evaluation instruments in use in child development programs at the national and California state levels. (Only open to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 119. Portfolio Development

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Summary seminar and portfolio development workshop required at the conclusion of each CDP Option competency. (Only open to students enrolled in CDP option.) CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 3 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 120. Professional Development Seminar

Open only to students enrolled in the Child Development Practitioner Option. Culminating experience in the CDP Option. Competency validation includes finalizing and presenting program portfolio, site review, and preparation for presentation of action research. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CFS 121. Field Work

Open only to students enrolled in the Chile Development Practioner Option. Supervised practice in an early care and education program. Concurrent with CFS 110, CFS 112, CFS 113, CFS 115, and CFS 122. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 122. Developmentally Appropriate Curriculum: Foundation and Models

Open only to students enrolled the Child Development Practitioner Option. A study of the historical and contexstual factors that have influenced curriculum development in early care and education. Examines the purpose and function of curriculum models. Compares and contrasts enduring models such as High Scope Montesori Direct Insturction, and Development-Interaction.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CFS 131. Family Relations

A study of family processes, the inner workings of families, from the perspective of family systems theory. Topics include the interplay of gender, temperament, and roles on family functioning, intergenerational transmission in families, communication, power dynamics, and development of the family over time.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 132T. Topics in Child Development and Family Relationships

Prerequisites: CFS 39 and/or CFS 131. Topics relating to child development and family relationships. Some topics may have labs.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 12 units

CFS 133S. Child and Family Crisis

Prerequisites: CFS 38 or CFS 39 or Psych 101.This course examines stress and crisis as experienced and perceived by children and their families. Topics to be covered include child abuse, divorce, remarriage, death, substance abuse, disability, immigration, poverty, and diverse populations. (Formerly CFS 133)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 134. Multicultural Perspectives on Children and Families

Prerequisites: CFS 38 or CFS 39 or Psych 101. Exploration of the challenges families face in living in a diverse society. Includes a survey of research on how children develop identity and attitudes about gender, ethnicity, and disability. An approach that facilitates healthy self identity and positive attitudes toward diversity.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 135. Parenting

Prerequisite: CFS 38, CFS 39, or PSYCH 101. Study of the significant impact of adult-child relationships upon the developing person. Topics include guidance and discipline theories, attachment, self-esteem, trust, encouragement, communication, consequences, rewards, punishment, abuse, and children with special needs.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 136. Adolescent Development

Prerequisite: CFS 38 or CFS 39 or Psych 101. Interdisciplinary study of physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of adolescents and emerging adults in a diverse society. Examines development of the self in the context of family, peer group, educational environments, work, community, and culture.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 137. Infant and Toddler Development

Prerequisite: CFS 38, CFS 39,or PSYCH 101. Interdisciplinary study of physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development from birth to three years in a diverse society. Examines development of the self in the context of family, community, and culture.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 139. Advanced Child Development Practicum

Prerequisites: CFS 37; CFS 38 or CFS 39 or Psych 101; junior or senior standing. Comprehensive study of the young child and ways to foster physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development. Students will plan developmentally appropriate learning episodes, conduct observations, and employ assessment techniques. (2 lecture, 3 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CFS 140. Advanced Child Development Theories

Prerequisites: CFS 38 or CFS 39 or PSYCH 101. In-depth study of major child development theories with implication for play for children infancy through adolescence. Course considers ethological and cultural perspectives, gender differences, and special populations. Examines psychoanalytic, sociocultural, attachment, cognitive, social learning, moral development, and information processing perspectives.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 141. Effective Relationships in the School Setting

Prerequisites: CFS 135 and CFS 133S or CFS 143. In-depth examination of the interrelationship of home and school experiences and their influences on a child's success, including concepts and strategies for building effective teacher-student and teacher-parent relationships in the school setting.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 143. Children at Risk

Examines environmental, societal, family, and developmental factors that contribute to risk from an ecological perspective. Explores categories and characteristics of high- and low-risk children with emphasis on early and middle childhood periods.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 145A. Observing the Development of Children

Prerequisites: CFS 38 or CFS 39 or PSYCH 101. Techniques in observing and recording development and behavior of school age children. Interpretation and reporting of observational data. Emphasis on children 6 to 13 years of age in diverse elementary school settings from developmental, ecological and systems perspectives. (2 hours lecture; 1 hour lab)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

CFS 145B. Advanced Observing of the Development of Children

Prerequisite: CFS 145A. Advanced application of techniques in observing and recording child development and behavior. Observation of children six to 13 years of age in diverse elementary school settings in affective, physical, and cognitive domains. Interpretation and reporting of observational data.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CFS 146. Middle Childhood

Prerequisites: CFS 38, CFS 39, or PSYCH 101. Interdisciplinary study of physical, social, emotional, and intellectual development of children 6-13 years of age in a diverse society. Examines development of the self in the context of the family, peer group, educational environments, community, and culture.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

CFS 193. Internship

Prerequisites: Completion of at least 60 units; good academic standing; permission of the department. Combines study with paid or unpaid work experience in a supervised career-related placement.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

CI 161. Mth Mtl H Ec

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 999 units

CSH 116. Consumer Aspects of Home Ownership

Emphasis on benefits and obligations of home ownership. Analysis of the consum er processes of selecting, buying, and maintaining a home.

Units: 3

EHD 154B. Final Student Teaching Seminar - H Ec

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in EHD 155B. Seminar to accompany final student teaching that provides opportunities for candidates to investigate and discuss variety of topics and strategies and to reflect on issues that surface during their student teaching experience.

Units: 1

EHD 155B. Studt Tchg H Ec

Prerequisites: admission to student teaching, EHD 155A, CI 161 (or concurrently, depending on major departmental policy); senior or post baccalaureate standing; approval of major department including subject matter competency approval; completion of the subject matter preparation program or passing the subject matter examination(s) designated by the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. Supervised teaching in single subject classroom; assignment is for the full day; five days per week. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 5-10, Repeatable up to 999 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FCS 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FCS 192. Readings and Conference

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Individually directed readings; reports and evaluation. (Hours arranged) Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FCS 203. Trends and Issues in Family and Consumer Sciences

A study of the history and current status of family and consumer sciences. An examination of trends and issues pertaining to child and family sciences, clothing and textiles/fashion merchandising, consumer science and housing, food and nutrition, and interior design. (Formerly HEC 241)

Units: 3

FCS 205. Survey of Family and Consumer Sciences Research

Prerequisite: FCS 203. Examination of current research in each area of family and consumer sciences. Abstract writing, formulation of annotated bibliographies and research presentations. (Fulfills university's graduate writing proficiency requirements) (Formerly H EC 201)

Units: 3

FCS 210T. Seminar in Consumer Science and Family Management

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Analytical study of problems pertaining to identifiable segments of the populace; intercultural, socioeconomic, age level and ethnic and community groups. Topics may include aspects of aging, cultural aspects of management, home and community relationships and ergonomics -- aspects of work simplification.

Units: 3

FCS 220T. Seminar in Clothing, Text

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Research and analysis of historical material and contemporary developments in clothing textiles, and fashion merchandising. Topics may include aspects of historical costume and textiles, technological developments in textiles, and trends in purveying fashion. Some topics may have labs.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FCS 230T. Seminar in Child Development, Family Relations

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Research, methodology, and issues in family relationships and child development. Topics may include parenting, families in transition, relationship patterns, infancy, early childhood, and family diversity.

Units: 3

FCS 240T. Seminar in Family and Consumer Sciences Education

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Applied research; current and future trends of the multilevel areas of family and consumer sciences education. Topics may include curriculum development, administration, evaluation, and supervision and incorporation of business and industry.

Units: 3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FCS 242. Community College Teaching in Family and Consumer Sciences

Strategies for implementing family and consumer sciences curriculum in community colleges. Study of instruction techniques, procedures, resources, problems and responsibilities in the community college setting.

Units: 3

FCS 290. Independent Study

See Academic Placement --Independent Study. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FCS 292. Readings in Family and Consumer Sciences

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Individually directed readings in a field of special concern to students in the graduate program; appropriate reports and evaluations required; individual confer ences, no formal class meetings. Approved for RP grad

Units: 2-3, Repeatable up to 6 units

FCS 298. Project

Prerequisite: prior advancement to candidacy. See Criteria for Thesis and Project. The project is a significant undertaking of an approved pursuit appropriate to the applied arts, e.g., extensive curriculum design, development of new consumer products, or similar professional endeavors with written documentation. Abstract required. Approved for RP grading

Units: 2-6

FCS 298C. Project Continuation

Pre-requisite: Project 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the project. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

FCS 299. Thesis

Prerequisite: prior advancement to candidacy; see Criteria for Thesis and Project. Preparation, completion, and submission of an acceptable thesis for the master's degree. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 2-6

FCS 299C. Thesis Continuation

Pre-requisite: Thesis 298. For continuous enrollment while completing the thesis. May enroll twice with department approval. Additional enrollments must be approved by the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Units: 0

FM 10. Professional Preparation & Development

Guidance and preparation for relevant and successful careers in the fashion industry. Focus on exploring job opportunities, professional norms, ethics, and behavior.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FM 20. Textile Science

Introduction to physical and chemical properties of textile fibers, yarns, fabric structures, finishes, and textile coloration. Criteria for selection and evaluation of textile properties, performance, and care. Review of pertinent regulations related to production, quality, and environmental protection.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

FM 21. Fashion Merchandising Fundamentals

Introduction to Fashion Merchandising with an overview of fashion products and the merchandising system.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FM 120. Social and Psychological Aspects of Clothing

The psychological, social, and economic aspects of clothing related to the individual, family, and society.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FM 122T. Topics in Clothing and Textiles

Topics relating to clothing, textiles, and fashion merchandising. Some topics may have labs.

Units: 1-4, Repeatable up to 12 units

FM 124. Textile Finishing

Prerequisite: FM 20. Finishing, dyeing and printing techniques, material and equipment. Evaluation through standard laboratory tests. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FM 126. History of Costume

Important periods of costume; their relationship to political, social, and economic conditions of the times and their importance in evolution and inspiration of modern dress.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FM 127. Fashion Merchandising

Prerequisite: FM 21 or permission of instructor; ACCT 3 or ACCT 4A (recommended). Principles of fashion merchandising as applied in manufacturing and retailing business organizations; study of planning, developing, and presenting product lines. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FM 128. Visual Merchandising

Prerequisite: FM 21 (may be taken concurrently). Aspects of visual merchandising and display, from classic techniques to most recent developments. Design fundamentals applied to the aesthetic arrangement of promotional and institutional displays in the retail store. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FM 130. Fashion Study Tours

An in-depth study of industrial, retail, and wholesale sites in California. Field experiences are included to ensure optimum learning opportunities. (1 lecture, 4 lab hours) (Course fee, $190)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FM 133. Textile/Apparel Economics

Prerequisites: FM 20 (may be taken concurrently); ECON 40 or AGBS 1. Organization and development of the textile and apparel industries. Aspects of production, consumption, and international trade. Analysis of current problems facing the industry and industry's response.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

FM 134. Fashion Retail Buying

Prerequisite: G.E. Math; FM 127 or permission of instructor. Basic principles and applications of retail mathematics as related to fashion retailing. Focuses on quantitative concepts used in merchandising fashion goods with an emphasis on profitability.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

FM 140. Fashion Entrepreneurship

Prerequisites: FM 20, FM 21, and FM 127; Senior standing for Fashion Merchandising majors or permission of instructor. Applying entrepreneurship principles to fashion apparel and accessories, from identifying new enterprise opportunities to analyzing the feasibility of business ideas by in-depth analysis of fashion consumers, markets, and merchandising strategies.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

Requirements

Bachelor of Science in Child Development Requirements

Major requirements (48 units)

Required courses (33 units)

CFS 37 or CFS 145A, CFS 39, 131, 133S, 134, 135, 140
either CFS 136 or 137 or 146
CFS 139 or 145B or 193
COUN 150
PSYCH 153

Elective courses (15 units)
See an adviser for approved elective courses.

Note: Completion of the victim services cluster may lead to the Certificate in Victim Services. See Criminology Department adviser for approval.

General Education requirements (51 units)

Electives and remaining degree requirements (21 units)
(see Degree Requirements); may be used toward a minor

Total (120 units)

Child Development Practitioner Option*

Major requirements (43 units)
Child Development Practitioner Option required courses: CFS 110, 112, 113, 114, 115, 117, 118, 119, 120 , 121, 122

General Education requirements (51 units)

Electives and remaining degree requirements (26 units)
Must include 12 units of lower-division child development coursework specified in Title 22 of the California Administrative Code (i.e., child development; child, family, and community; creative experiences for young children; child development practicum; or equivalents.)

Total (120 units)

* The Child Development Practitioner Option has been suspended as of spring 2012.

Eligibility Criteria

  1. Admission to California State University, Fresno.
  2. Completion of lower-division General Education requirements; G.E. certified or approval of coordinator. Students must develop a plan with the CDP option coordinator for completion of other degree requirements.
  3. Junior standing.
  4. Minimum of three years full-time experience in child development programs.
  5. Current employment in a child development program.
  6. Statement from employer granting permission for student to use work site for program activities.
  7. Twelve units of specified early childhood education or child development coursework - see Electives and Remaining Degree Requirements above.)
  8. A passing score on the Upper-Division Writing Skills Exam or a C or higher in a UDWS course. Note: Students who do not earn a passing grade on the UDWS exam, but who are admitted into the Child Development Practitioner Option, must successfully complete the university writing requirement by exam or course by the beginning of the third competency.
  9. Admission to the Child Development Practitioner Option.

 

Faculty

CFCS faculty members are highly qualified professionals with advanced degrees from universities across the nation. They bring practical insights and experience to the classroom, resulting from a wide variety of professional activities, research, publications, community service, and consulting.

Name Degree Email Phone
Atwal, Kabeljit K Master of Arts katwal@csufresno.edu 559.278.5310
Buettner, Jamie L Master of Arts jabuettner@csufresno.edu
Chipperfield, Jennifer L Master of Arts jchipperfield@csufresno.edu
Davis, Dean B Master of Business Admin dedavis@csufresno.edu
Davis, Lizhu Y Doctor of Philosophy lidavis@csufresno.edu 559.278.8755
Dekruif, Linda Master of Arts lindad@csufresno.edu
Dyer, Kathleen D Doctor of Philosophy kdyer@csufresno.edu 559.278.4720
Hammons, Amber Doctor of Philosophy ahammons@csufresno.edu 559.278.1158
Major, Alma L Master of Arts amajor@csufresno.edu 559.278.2558
Malone, Gary A Master of Arts gmalone@csufresno.edu 559.278.5139
McKenzie, Jessica Doctor of Philosophy jmckenzie@csufresno.edu
Mikow, Marilyn Master of Arts mmikow@csufresno.edu
Reid, Kathleen Doctor of Philosophy kreid@csufresno.edu 559.278.1079
Rickman, Aimee Doctor of Philosophy arickman@csufresno.edu
Stratford, Kent L Master of Science kstratford@csufresno.edu
Swallow, Susan R Master of Education sswallow@csufresno.edu

Roadmap

B.S. in Child Development

Year One

Fall

  • GE Area A1 Oral Communication
  • GE Area A2
  • Ge Area B4-Quantitative Reasoning
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • GE Area E1

Spring

  • GE Area A3 Critical Thinking
  • GE Area B1-Physical Science
  • GE Area C1-Arts
  • Lower Division Major Course
  • Free Elective:

Year Two

Fall

  • GE Area B2-Life Sciences

  • GE Area C2-Humanities

  • GE Area D1-American History
  • GE Area D3-Social Science

  • Lower Division Major Course:

Spring

  • GE Area D2
  • GE Area C1-Arts

  • OR
    GE Area C2-Humanities
  • Major Course :
  • Free Elective :

Year Three

Fall

  • Major Course:
  • Major Course:
  • GE Area 1B-Physical Univ & Life Forms
  • Free Elective:

Spring

  • Major Course:
  • Major Course:
  • GE Area 1C-Arts & Humanities
  • Free Elective:

Year Four

Fall

  • Major Course:

  • Major Course:
  • GE Area 1D-Soc, Pol, Econ Inst &
    Behavior, Hist Bkgnd
  • Free Elective:

Spring

  • Major Course:
  • Major Course:
  • GE Area MI-Multicultural/ International
  • Free Elective:

Careers

Child Development

The Bachelor of Science in Child Development provides breadth and depth in the child and family sciences. It is an excellent foundational degree for individuals who wish to pursue careers or graduate studies in social services, education, child and family health, family law, counseling, or college teaching. It is also a degree that provides excellent preparation to those who have, or will have, families.

The department maintains laboratory facilities that support our academic programs. These include clothing and textile labs, a child and family observation lab, and two child care labs serving infants, toddlers, and preschool children in which students study child behavior and development under the supervision of faculty and laboratory teaching staff.

What You Can Earn

Licensed Professional Counselor
$36,358 (in Fresno)

Child Care Center Director
$69,045 (in Fresno)

Source: HR Reported data in salary.com as of December 5, 2012

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Introduction to Child and Adolescent Development
  • Child and Family Crisis
  • Family Relations
  • Multicultural Perspectives on Children and Families

What You Can Learn

  • Physical, social, emotional and intellectual development from conception through adolescence
  • Families, their place within society, and their influence on human behavior
  • Stress and crisis as experienced and perceived by children and their families

About the College

The Jordan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology can offer you the education you will need to be a leader in agriculture and related sciences in the New California. We offer outstanding programs in the traditional areas of agriculture, including animal sciences, plant science, agricultural education, viticulture and agricultural business. And, we offer excellent programs in areas which are uniquely related to agriculture, including nutrition and dietetics, food science, enology, child development, family science, fashion merchandizing and industrial technology.

College Contact Information

Jordan College of Agricultural Sciences and Technology
2415 E. San Ramon,
MS AS79
Fresno, CA 93740
Phone: 559.278.2061
Fax: 559.278.4496

Department Contact Information

Child, Family and Consumer Sciences
5300 N Campus Drive, M/S FF12
Fresno, CA 93740-8019

Department Phone: (559) 278-2283
Department Fax: (559) 278-8424

Department Office: Family and Food Science Building, Room 111