Recreation Administration - Community Recreation & Youth Services Option, B.S.

Department

Department of Recreation Administration

Nancy Nisbett, Chair
Professional and Human Services Building, Room 121
559.278.2838
FAX: 559.278.5267
www.fresnostate.edu/recadmin

Degrees and Programs Offered

BS in Recreation Administration, B.S.
BS in Recreation Administration - Therapeutic Recreation Option, B.S.
BS in Recreation Administration - Adventure Recreation & Tourism Option, B.S.
BS in Recreation Administration - Commercial Recreation & Event Planning Option, B.S.
BS in Recreation Administration - Community Recreation & Youth Services Option, B.S.
BS in Recreation Administration - Sports & Entertainment Facility Management Option, B.S.
MN in Recreation Administration, Minor

The department offers a Bachelor of Science degree in Recreation Administration for individuals who are committed to the recreation and leisure services profession. The major in Recreation Administration prepares students with the knowledge, understanding, ability, and skill necessary to successfully function in professional positions related to the major.

Curriculum

Accredited by the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions, the department offers a B.S. and a Minor in Recreation Administration.

Students in the recreation administration major complete a core of courses. These courses are designed to assist students in acquiring competencies related to the principles of recreation, leadership, group dynamics, and leisure behavior. Courses also cover legal and financial aspects of recreation service, advanced program planning, organization and administration of leisure services, evaluation, and professionalism.

Students develop specific skills in the areas of communication, human behavior, youth services, entrepreneurism, and adventure-based recreation and tourism, finance, management, marketing, funding, resources, program planning and supervision, and facility management.

Under the guidance of a practitioner, students in recreation administration are encouraged to acquire 1,000 hours of paid or voluntary hands-on experience in a variety of recreation, clinical, or leisure services agencies. In addition, they complete full-time internships with commercial recreation and tourism enterprises, public recreation agencies, nonprofit organizations, park-oriented agencies, hospitals, rehabilitation centers, and other service organizations.

Students may apply for an out-of-state internship if they achieve a major GPA of 3.3 and a cumulative GPA of 3.0. Additional requirements must also be met.

Courses

Recreation Administration

RA 55. Foundations and Careers in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Philosophical, theoretical, and historical basis for recreation service in contemporary American society; exploration of the various facets of recreation parks and tourism including public, nonprofit, therapeutic, and commercial recreation. (CAN REC 2)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 70. Residential Life and Student Involvement Leadership

Exploration into principles and theories of leadership within residential life and student involvement. Focus is on personal decision-making, diversity, human and group development. Outcomes will be achieved through discussion, self-assessment, experiential exercises, and observation of leadership practice. (Formerly RA 192T)

Units: 2, Repeatable up to 8 units
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 73S. Leadership in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Course addresses leadership as a field of study and personal development with a focus on theory, technique, and direct service application in a recreation setting. A service learning component will be integrated to foster reflection and growth.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 77S. Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Programming

Course covers the recreation program process including an introduction to activity plans, program design, delivery, and evaluation. Student will design and implement two recreation programs through service-learning projects to foster skill application and practice

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 80. Lifelong Learning in the Natural Environment

Exploration of the social, psychological, and physiological implications of experiential learning and personal growth using experiences based in the natural environment. Dymanics of identifying personal interests and skills. Discovering resource-based leaarning opportunities in leisure appropriate across the life stages. G.E. Breadth E1.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: E1

RA 101. Leisure and Human Behavior

Prerequisite: RA 55. Exploration of leisure as related to the individual and society. Forces and factors affecting its role on human behavior are examined within the context of current social issues. (Students may incur minimal expenses related to field trips.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 106. Challenge Course Facilitation

Facility-based adventure programming skills (e.g., ropes courses and climbing walls) taught on the E.D.G.E. Challenge Course. Students will learn specific sequencing, processing, debriefing, and leadership techniques for adventure education. Covers competencies established by the Association for Challenge Course Technology. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 113. Serving At-Risk Youth

Examination of the forces and factors that place youth at risk. Review of service models and leadership styles that affect outcomes for at-risk youths with emphasis on agencies that hoave developed successful program approaches. (Formerly RLS 192T)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 115. Community Placements in Leisure Settings

Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment with RA 113 or RA 117 or RA 146 or RA 150. Service oriented course providing opportunites to observe, interact, and learn from community placement in leisure services. Hour requirements are supported through writing and discussion on issues and solutions. CR/NC grading only. (Formerly RLS 192T) (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 117. Special Event Planning

Special techniques and requirements for planning and conducting large community functions such as street fairs, commmunity festivals, major fund-raisers, corporate events, and joint sponsorship. Emphasis on community laws and regulations, activity selection and planning, advertising, and funding. Field trips and/or other off-campus experiences will be required. (Students may incur minimal expenses related to field trips.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 119. Conference, Convention, and Meeting Planning

As examination of the conference, convention, and meeting industry, inclusive of the design, budgeting, and programming principles utilized within the industry. Provide an essential understanding of the components involved in the operation of successful meetings, conventions, and conferences.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 121. Community and Non-Profit Recreation Services

Prerequisite: RA 55 or concurrent (for RA majors only). Philosophical foundations and future outlook of non-profit and municipal recreation programs. Review of service providers including organization, service provision, legal base, funding profiles, and current trends analysis. (Field trips may be required.) (Formerly RA 121)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 125. Diversity and Inclusive Practices in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisite: RA 55 for RA majors. Introduction to diverse populations including terminology, etiology, legislation, facilities, trends, barriers, and relationship to leisure. Understanding alternative views of exceptionality and appreciating similarities and differences. Awareness of adaptations/strategies to maximize participation opportunities.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 128. Legal and Financial Aspects of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisite: RA 55 and 77S. Legal and financial aspects of recreation, parks, and tourism; funding sources, budget development and administration, legal issues, and risk management and their role in recreation administration. (Formerly RLS 128)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 128L. Legal and Financial Aspects of Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Lab

Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment with RA 128. The lab emphasizes the development of budgets and data analysis methods for park, recreation, and tourism agencies through the use of a variety of computer programs.

Units: 2
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 130. International Tourism: Multicultural Issues and Impacts

Prerequisites: GE Foundation and Breadth Area D. Prepares students to live in an international multicultural world, as both a responsible tourist or gracious host who appreciates cultural differences, respects the environment, and understand the impacts of international tourism.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring
GE Area: M/I

RA 131. Foundations of Commercial Recreation and Tourism

Prerequisite: RA 55. Historical and philosophical foundations of leisure service provisions by commercial recreation and tourism agencies. Review of selected service providers including organization, assessment, service provision, legal base, funding profiles, and current trends analysis. (Field trips may be required.)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 133. Recreation and Parks Facilities Planning and Operations

Prerequisite: RA 77S. Emphasis will be on the planning, management, and operations of recreation and parks facilities. Facility layout for use in activity presentation, safety procedures, staffing, risk management, and maintenance. (Field trips may be required.) (Formerly RLS 133)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 135. Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Marketing

Prerequisite: RA 77S or RA majors only. Analysis and development of marketing and promotion strategies for recreation, parks, and tourism programs and services, and an in-depth analysis of recreation feasibility plans.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 139. Research and Evaluation in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisites: RA 128 and RA 128L, and completion of Upper Division Writing Requirement. Overview of research and evaluation methods as applied to recreation, parks, and tourism services.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 142. Foundations of Therapeutic Recreation Services

Prerequisites: RA 55 and RA 125 or permission of instructor. Historical review and future outlook of theraputic recreation; identification of interventions used for specific population groups. Review etiology characteristics, terminology and support systems. Facility design, use, and adaptation. Practical experienced required.

Units: 3

RA 144A. Assessment and Documentation in Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisite: RA 142. Application of therapeutic recreation methods including assessment, program design, documentation, and evaluation. (Formerly RLS 144A)

Units: 3

RA 144B. Facilitation Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisites: RA 142; RA 144A. Practical experiences in applying therapeutic recreation intervention methods.

Units: 3

RA 146. Adventure Based Programming

Prerequisite: RA 55 and RA 80 for RA majors. Explore adventure based programming skills through outdoor pursuits and experiential activities on the E.D.G.E. Challenge Course. (2 lecture, 2 lab hours) (Students will incur expenses related to required field trips)

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 148. Process and Principles in Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisites: RA 144A, RA 144B. Designing and evaluating therapeutic recreation programs for healthcare and community settings. Practical program experience required. (Formerly RLS 148)

Units: 3

RA 149. Trends and Issues in Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisites: RA 148. In-depth examination of contemporary professional issues and their relationship to current and future development of therapeutic recreation services.

Units: 3

RA 150. Sports and Entertainment Facility Management

Prerequisite: RA 55 is recommended for RA majors. Examination of the ownership & governance, function, programming, and management of sports and entertainment facilities including arenas, performing arts centers, stadiums, convention and conference centers. Economic impacts, professional associations, and career development in this industry are also covered.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Fall

RA 152. Sports and Entertainment Facility Booking, Promotion and Box Office Operations

Prerequisites: RA 150; RA 135 or MKTG 100S, plus concurrent enrollment in RA 154 Booking , promotion and box office operations techniques for sports and entertainment facilities and their events.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 154. Sports and Entertainment Facility Operations

Prerequisites: RA 150; RA 135 or MKTG 100S, plus concurrent enrollment in RA 152. Operations of sport and entertainment facilities including: set-up configurations, event staffing, event production, security & crowd control, merchandise, food & beverage, ADA, risk management, housekeeping and maintenance. Includes field trips (3 lecture, 2 lab hours)

Units: 4
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 179. Supervision and Administration in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisite: RA 73S. Preparation for a supervisory role in recreation, parks, and tourism agencies. Recruitment, motivation, performance evaluation, training and development, and other supervisory and management practices.

Units: 3
Course Typically Offered: Spring

RA 180. Professional Placement in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisite: may only be taken the semester prior to internship. Professionalism and internship search procedures in recreation, parks, and tourism.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 184. Internship in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisites: completion of all major, General Education, and university graduation requirements. Honors internship requires placement approval in RA 180. Directed supervisory experience with a nonprofit, public, or commercial recreation agency. Individual development in administration, supervision, program planning, and public relations. Reports and conferences required. (It is recommended before registering for internship that students have the equivalent of 1,000 hours of recreation related experience, either paid or volunteer, in a recreation service agency.) (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 12
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 187. Internship in Therapeutic Recreation

Prerequisites: completion of all major, General Education, and university graduation requirements. Honors internship requires placement approval in RA 180. Supervised, directed full-time experience in the field of therapeutic recreation; reports and conferences required. (It is recommended before internship registrarion that students have the equivalent of 1,000 hours of recreation related experience, either paid or volunteer, in the field of recreation service).

Units: 12
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 190. Independent Study

See Academic Placement -- [-LINK-]. Approved for RP grading.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 6 units
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

RA 192T. Topics in Recreation, Parks, and Tourism

Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Investigation of selected topics related to: administration, supervision and leadership in public recreation; therapeutic recreation; camping; and workshops related to skills in leisure oriented activities.

Units: 1-3, Repeatable up to 8 units

REC 74. Games for All Ages

Planning, design, and leadership techniques for a variety of games appropriate for diverse populations and age groups. CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1

REC 75. Adventure Ropes Course Experience

An experiential journey of self-awareness, esteem building, and group processing through initiative games and high ropes elements. CR/NC grading only. (Course fee, $30)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall, Spring

REC 82. Wilderness Survival Skills

Backcountry skills for preventing or responding to emergency situations in the wilderness, such as fire and shelter building, signaling, and land navigation. Explores interpersonal and intrapersonal reactions to crisis situations. (Formerly RLS 192T) CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1

REC 83. Whitewater Rafting

Learn fundamental skills for traveling down America's streams and rivers. Topics include safety, levels and conditions, rescues, and river craft. The course will culminate in a whitewater rafting trip on the upper Kings river. (Course fee, $65) CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1

REC 84. Orienteering

Fundamental skills and knowledge for traveling outdoors by map and compass, and by knowledge of natural features. (Formerly RLS 192T) CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1

REC 86. Backpacking in the Sierra Mountains

Fundamental skills and knowledge for backpacking, carcamping, and hiking in the Sierra Mountains or similar settings. Includes skills for camping, hiking, basic navigation, trip planning, and outdoor cooking, plus safety and environmental issues. (Formerly RLS 192T) CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Spring

REC 87. A Yosemite Experience

A multidimensional Yosemite National Park experience including history, park planning, recreation uses, and natural resources and tourism management issues. Includes an overnight field trip with recreation activities (Course fee, $30)

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Spring

REC 88. Rock Climbing

Basic skills and knowledge of rockclimbing including history, trends, equipment, climbing technique, top roping, knot tying, rappelling, training, safety, and environmental issues. (Formerly RLS 192T) CR/NC grading only.

Units: 1
Course Typically Offered: Fall

REC 92. Discount Travel

Learn about the travel industry and how to get discounts for airfare, hotels, rental cars, tours, and other travel services for both domestic and international travel.

Units: 1, Repeatable up to 8 units

REC 178. Supervision in Recreation and Parks

Units: 3

REC 179. Problems in Recreation Parks

Units: 3

REC 181. Relations in Recreation and Park Services

Community and public relations in recreational agency work, and in recreation and park work.

Units: 3

RLS 73L. Recreation Leadership & Programming Laboratory

Concurrent enrollment with RLS 73. Practical leadership experience in classroom and supervised recreation settings. (CSU liability insurance fee, $8)

Units: 1

RLS 108. Advanced Challenge Course Facilitation

Focuses on advanced debriefing and processing techniques including frontloading and designing metaphors used in facility-based adventure programming such as ropes courses and portable initiative courses. Prior ropes course training or RLS 106 recommended. (Formerly RLS 192T)

Units: 1

Requirements

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements
Recreation Administration Major

Major requirements (65-69 units)
The following core program courses are required of all candidates for this degree. Additional required courses dependent upon the selected emphasis area.

Courses
RA 55, 73S, 77S, 80, 101, 125, 128, 128L, 179, 180 (27 units)

Emphases (38-42 units)

General Education requirements (51 units)

Electives and remaining degree requirements (1-7 units)

Total (120 units)*

*This total indicates that a maximum of 3 units in General Education also may be applied to 3 units of electives in the RA major as follows: RA 80 or GERON 10S in G.E. Breadth E1. Consult the department chair or faculty adviser for additional details.

Advising Notes

  1. CR/NC grading is not permitted in the recreation administration major with the exceptions of REC 74, 75, 82, 84, 86, 88; RA 115, and 192T.
  2. General Education and elective units may be used toward a minor (see departmental minor below). Consult the appropriate department chair, program coordinator, or faculty adviser for further information.
  3. Students who must complete a course to fulfill the Upper-Division Writing Skills requirement are advised to take BA 105W
  4. All Recreation Administration courses used in the major must be completed with a grade of C or higher.

Faculty

Faculty are committed to providing a high quality professional preparation program in recreation and leisure services, founded on a competency based curriculum. Our graduates acquire specific skills as identified by practitioners, faculty, and the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions. These competencies are related to leadership, program planning, recreation and leisure oriented activities, budgeting, evaluation of programs and personnel, history, professional ethics, philosophy, research techniques, marketing and public relations, communication skills, organi-zational systems, laws and legislation, facility management and administration, and therapeutic techniques. Students may elect to study: (1) community recreation and youth services, (2) commercial recreation and event planning, (3) adventure recreation and tourism, (4) sports and entertainment facility management, (5) therapeutic recreation.

Name Degree Email Phone
Butchert, Justin E Master of Business Admin jbutchert@csufresno.edu 559.278.2838
Dominguez, Joseph E Bachelor of Science jdominguez@csufresno.edu
Fine, Lawrence J Doctor of Philosophy larryf@csufresno.edu 559.278.2629
Guerrero, Rico Master of Arts rguerrero@csufresno.edu
Jett, Scott R thejetts@gmail.com
Lankford, Samuel V Doctor of Philosophy slankford@csufresno.edu 319.273.6840
Mahoney, Michael Doctorate of Education mmahoney@csufresno.edu 559.278.5263
Markland, Karen S Master of Arts kmarkland@csufresno.edu
Mundell, Lerin L Master of Arts lmundell@csufresno.edu 559.347.3815
Nisbett, Nancy Doctorate of Education nancyni@csufresno.edu 559.278.7886
Soares, Ryan R Master of Science rsoares@csufresno.edu 559.278.2838
Taylor, Brandon T Master of Arts brtaylor@csufresno.edu
Trimble, Samara C Master of Science strimble@csufresno.edu
Whiting, Jason W Doctor of Philosophy jawhiting@csufresno.edu 559.278.8749

Roadmap

B.S. in Recreation Administration (Community Recreation & Youth Services)

Year One

Fall

  • GE Area A1-Oral Communication
  • GE Area A2-Written Communication
  • GE Area A3-Critical Thinking
  • GE Area C1-Arts
  • GE Area B4-Quantitative Reasoning

Spring

  • GE Area B1-Physical Science
  • GE Area B2-Life Sciences
  • GE Area C2-Humanities
  • GE Area C1-Arts - OR - C2-Humanities
  • GE Area D1-American History

Year Two

Fall

  • Major Core Course:

  • Major Core Course:

  • Major Core Course:
  • GE Area E1-Lifelong Understanding

Spring

  • GE Area D3-Social Science
  • Major Core Course :
  • Major Core Course:
  • Major Core Course:

Year Three

Fall

  • Major Core Course:

  • Major Core Course:
  • Major Emphasis Area Course:
  • Major Specialization Course::
  • GE Area IB-Physical Univ & Life Forms
  • Upper Division Writing Requirements:

Spring

  • Major Emphasis Area Course:
  • Major Emphasis Area Course:
  • Major Emphasis Area Course:
  • Recreation Adm Elective:
  • GE Area IC-Arts & Humanities

Year Four

Fall

  • Major Specialization Course:
  • Major Specialization Course:
  • Recreation Adm Elective:
  • GE Area ID-Soc, Pol, Econ Inst & Beh, Hist
  • GE Area MI-Multicultural/ International
  • Free Elective:

Spring

  • Major Emphasis Area Course:

Careers

athletes get ready to run a race

Recreation Administration is the academic program for students who want to prepare for a career in the "Recreation and Leisure Industry." Overall, the Recreation Industry, including tourism, is a huge and diverse industry with over $1 trillion of spending within the U.S. each year.

We manage facilities, programs, and services that help people have a higher quality of life through positive, enjoyable, and enriching recreation and leisure experiences. That's what recreation and leisure professionals do, and our curriculum helps students learn the necessary skills to facilitate such experiences.

What You Can Earn

Campus Recreation Director
$63,993 (in our region)

Recreation Coordinator 
$44,078 (Intramurals - in our region)

Source: salary.com as of December 2012

Based on a 2009 national survey of full-time professionals by Recreation Management Magazine:

Golf/Country Club
$73,900

U.S. Gov. Military Recreation
$69,800

Resort/Resort Hotel
$66,400

School District Recreation Program
$66,000

City Parks & Recreation Department
$63,300

Private Recreation/Sports Center
$60,000

Community Recreation/Sports Center
$58,200

YMCA/YWCA/JCC
$57,300

College/University Recreation/Intramurals
$57,200

Sports/Health/Fitness Club
$53,900

Youth/Private Camp
$53,000

Campground/RV Park
$52,200

Interesting Classes You Might Take

  • Leadership in Recreation, Parks and Tourism
  • Lifelong Learning in the Natural Environment
  • Leisure and Human Behavior
  • Challenge Course Facilitation
  • Serving At-Risk Youth
  • Special Event Planning
  • Diversity and Inclusive Practices in Recreation
  • Sports and Entertainment Facility Booking, Promotion, and Box Office Operations

What You Can Learn

Fundamental skills and knowledge for traveling outdoors by map and compass, and by knowledge of natural features

Leisure as related to the individual and society

A knowledge of the conference, convention, and meeting industry, inclusive of the design, budgeting, and programming principles used within the industry

The development of budgets and data analysis methods for park, recreation, and tourism agencies through the use of a variety of computer programs

About the College

The College of Health and Human Services offers a broad range of fully accredited post-secondary and graduate educational programs to more than 2100 students each year. The College includes the Departments of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Studies, Gerontology, Kinesiology, Nursing, Physical Therapy, Public Health, Recreation Administration, and Social Work Education.

Residents and communities in the Central California region continue to face serious issues within the health and human service environment that will require continuing generations of well-prepared health and human service professionals.

College Contact Information

2345 E. San Ramon
M/S MH26
Fresno CA 93740-8031

Phone: (559) 278-4004

FAX: (559) 278-4437

Department Contact Information

Department of Recreation Administration 
California State University, Fresno 
5310 N. Campus Drive M/S PH103 
Fresno CA 93740-8019

Phone: (559) 278-2838 
FAX: (559) 278-5267 
email

Where We're Located

Professional Human Services (PHS) Building Room 121